3 betting small pocket pairs app

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3 betting small pocket pairs app football grid game for betting

3 betting small pocket pairs app

A skilled opponent will pick up on this and exploit you. Your bet sizing should not be determined by the strength of your hand. The answer is position. You hear it over and over again — position dictates everything in poker.

This is because you will be last to act for the entirety of the hand. Since acting last is such a huge advantage, you can punish the out-of-position player often, regardless of your hand strength. When you are in position a good re-raise size would be around 3x to 3. He folds. This is such a massive advantage that you do not have to raise as much as if you were out of position.

To make up for this you always want to reraise more from out of position. Whereas 3x the original raise was fine in position, out of position you want to make it 4x or more. You essentially would like to charge him for the privilege of playing in position against you. Giving your opponent good odds and position is a mistake so let them know you mean business with larger out-of-position raises.

The larger raise helps negate your positional disadvantage. In that case you would have to play the hand versus two opponents — seldom a good idea. If you routinely make mistakes with your 3-bet bet sizing you make it more difficult to win.

Far from it. Of those hands only a small percentage can continue on to more action. That alone creates enough dead money to make three-betting profitable. Three-betting also balances your range. When you three-bet preflop and get called you have the initiative. You have the lead in the hand and with it comes the advantage. Now what happens if you miss the flop completely?

Use that initiative. Look at the situation and think about his likely holdings. Know your opponent. You have to know your opponent and how he plays. He calls and everyone else folds. Your read on your opponent is that he is a thinking, but not great, regular. He tends to over-estimate his implied odds and plays too ABC. He checks. He thinks and calls. A mistake a lot of players make here is checking back. Checking back in this spot is lighting money on fire. Because your opponent will be peeling with an extremely wide one-pair range.

Think about it. Say you raise 99 before the flop and your opponent re-raises you. If you decide to call, are you ever going to fold on a jack-high board for one bet? Fire that second barrel. Most of his flop-peeling range is not strong enough to call a second bet. Players like this are a dime a dozen. These players are free money and are going to donate 25bb to you every single time in this spot. When you three-bet pre-flop and bet two streets, your opponent is regularly going to be putting you on a big hand.

So exploit it and fire more second barrels. You want to put him outside his comfort zone. You need well-timed aggression in the correct spots. But if it keeps coming off bricks you should probably stop firing without a very specific read. Chances are there are a few at every table you play it.

Put them on a range and find the breaking point for their hand. Then bring them to it. Play Here. You still do have a pair; since most hands miss most flops, you will still likely have the best hand. If you think you have the best hand and your opponent will call with worse, bet. If you think your opponent will fold, bet. You will also be continuation betting on the flop with a slightly narrower range, but still frequently.

When you're betting the flop with both made hands and bluffs, you become a very difficult player to read. When you are a difficult player to read, your opponents will be more willing to pay you off when you make your hand. Yes; they will also play back at you when you don't have a hand, but you can then safely fold and it should only lose you a couple of small bets. This is why pocket pairs are so strong. When they flop, they flop hands strong enough to go to war with stacks over.

This is why raising first in with a pocket pair is your best possible play with it. You will often win the pot initially with your raise; other times, you'll take the pot down with a continuation bet on the flop; still other times, you'll win when you flop a set. When there is a raise in front of you, you have to play pocket pairs a little bit more gingerly. Many six-max players three-bet these pocket pairs religiously. I believe this is flawed thinking. As I discussed in the "don't overuse the light three-bet" article, three-betting a hand like a pocket pair is counterintuitive.

Pocket pairs are too strong to fold. You'd obviously like to continue with the hand, so calling is the best play. Three-betting will often cause your opponent to fold before the flop, giving you no chance to actually win his stack. You may win more small pots, but seldom will you stack him. Also, you risk being reraised and forced to fold your three-bet and the equity you have invested in the pot.

Your best bet when playing small pocket pairs against raises is to flat-call and play poker on the flop. Three-betting them is just fancy-play syndrome and does nothing to increase your overall expectation. This is a tricky spot. If you raise before the flop and find yourself reraised, you should fold most of the time - unless your opponent is a compulsive three-bettor or your stacks are very deep.

Even if your opponent is a compulsive three-bettor, you should seldom just call. Be aware of your position and your image. Unless the stacks are deep you are not getting the implied odds to call for set value; if you are out of position it further complicates things. You will be out of position against a three-bettor on a flop that is often going to miss you. You are almost always going to be forced into check-folding. Instead, your best bet is just to fold and wait for a better spot.

If you're in position against a three-bettor you should still likely fold. If your opponent is a serial three-bettor, you may call with the intention of bluffing later or four-bet him as a bluff. This should be done very seldom, and only versus a player you know you have fold equity against. The bulk of the value of small pocket pairs comes when you flop a set. It isn't going to happen all the time, so if you're going to be playing them fast before the flop, you had better have some fold equity as well.

GOLF BETTING EACH WAY DEAD HEAT CAST

And those mistakes are numbers added to your bankroll at the end of the night. You know that your opponent is raising light, you can three-bet him light and have him fold, winning you the pot immediately. This leads to you winning more pots without showdown as well as getting action on your real, three-bet-for-value-type hands.

But although the practice of three-betting light is commonplace these days, many players still routinely size their three-bets incorrectly. Some players size their re-raises on the strength of their own hand. They bet a bigger amount when they have a weak hand and want their opponent to fold and bet less when they are betting for value.

This is incorrect thinking. A skilled opponent will pick up on this and exploit you. Your bet sizing should not be determined by the strength of your hand. The answer is position. You hear it over and over again — position dictates everything in poker. This is because you will be last to act for the entirety of the hand. Since acting last is such a huge advantage, you can punish the out-of-position player often, regardless of your hand strength.

When you are in position a good re-raise size would be around 3x to 3. He folds. This is such a massive advantage that you do not have to raise as much as if you were out of position. To make up for this you always want to reraise more from out of position. Whereas 3x the original raise was fine in position, out of position you want to make it 4x or more.

You essentially would like to charge him for the privilege of playing in position against you. Giving your opponent good odds and position is a mistake so let them know you mean business with larger out-of-position raises.

The larger raise helps negate your positional disadvantage. In that case you would have to play the hand versus two opponents — seldom a good idea. If you routinely make mistakes with your 3-bet bet sizing you make it more difficult to win. Far from it. Of those hands only a small percentage can continue on to more action.

That alone creates enough dead money to make three-betting profitable. Three-betting also balances your range. When you three-bet preflop and get called you have the initiative. You have the lead in the hand and with it comes the advantage. Now what happens if you miss the flop completely? Use that initiative.

Look at the situation and think about his likely holdings. Know your opponent. You have to know your opponent and how he plays. He calls and everyone else folds. Your read on your opponent is that he is a thinking, but not great, regular. He tends to over-estimate his implied odds and plays too ABC. He checks. He thinks and calls. A mistake a lot of players make here is checking back. Checking back in this spot is lighting money on fire.

Because your opponent will be peeling with an extremely wide one-pair range. Think about it. Say you raise 99 before the flop and your opponent re-raises you. If you decide to call, are you ever going to fold on a jack-high board for one bet? Fire that second barrel. Most of his flop-peeling range is not strong enough to call a second bet. Players like this are a dime a dozen.

These players are free money and are going to donate 25bb to you every single time in this spot. When you three-bet pre-flop and bet two streets, your opponent is regularly going to be putting you on a big hand. So exploit it and fire more second barrels. You still do have a pair; since most hands miss most flops, you will still likely have the best hand.

If you think you have the best hand and your opponent will call with worse, bet. If you think your opponent will fold, bet. You will also be continuation betting on the flop with a slightly narrower range, but still frequently. When you're betting the flop with both made hands and bluffs, you become a very difficult player to read.

When you are a difficult player to read, your opponents will be more willing to pay you off when you make your hand. Yes; they will also play back at you when you don't have a hand, but you can then safely fold and it should only lose you a couple of small bets. This is why pocket pairs are so strong. When they flop, they flop hands strong enough to go to war with stacks over. This is why raising first in with a pocket pair is your best possible play with it.

You will often win the pot initially with your raise; other times, you'll take the pot down with a continuation bet on the flop; still other times, you'll win when you flop a set. When there is a raise in front of you, you have to play pocket pairs a little bit more gingerly. Many six-max players three-bet these pocket pairs religiously.

I believe this is flawed thinking. As I discussed in the "don't overuse the light three-bet" article, three-betting a hand like a pocket pair is counterintuitive. Pocket pairs are too strong to fold. You'd obviously like to continue with the hand, so calling is the best play. Three-betting will often cause your opponent to fold before the flop, giving you no chance to actually win his stack.

You may win more small pots, but seldom will you stack him. Also, you risk being reraised and forced to fold your three-bet and the equity you have invested in the pot. Your best bet when playing small pocket pairs against raises is to flat-call and play poker on the flop.

Three-betting them is just fancy-play syndrome and does nothing to increase your overall expectation. This is a tricky spot. If you raise before the flop and find yourself reraised, you should fold most of the time - unless your opponent is a compulsive three-bettor or your stacks are very deep. Even if your opponent is a compulsive three-bettor, you should seldom just call. Be aware of your position and your image. Unless the stacks are deep you are not getting the implied odds to call for set value; if you are out of position it further complicates things.

You will be out of position against a three-bettor on a flop that is often going to miss you. You are almost always going to be forced into check-folding. Instead, your best bet is just to fold and wait for a better spot. If you're in position against a three-bettor you should still likely fold. If your opponent is a serial three-bettor, you may call with the intention of bluffing later or four-bet him as a bluff.

This should be done very seldom, and only versus a player you know you have fold equity against. The bulk of the value of small pocket pairs comes when you flop a set. It isn't going to happen all the time, so if you're going to be playing them fast before the flop, you had better have some fold equity as well.

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DAVID S DEAD CELEBRITY BB BETTING

Lab members may also access the charts on the go with the Upswing Poker mobile app for iPhone and Android. As with opening ranges, the profitability of calling with pocket pairs depends on our own position, but also that of the original raiser. There are only two positions from which we can always call an open-raise with our low pocket pairs: the big blind and the button.

We can defend our big blind with all of these hands for a couple of reasons:. Calling from the button with these hands is profitable because of our positional advantage and the reduced chance of a player squeezing behind. While we can call with 55 and 44 at some frequency, calling with pairs worse than this can be problematic. If there are aggressive players sat to our left, we are likely to face squeezes that make flatting with hands like 22 and 33 and sometimes even 44 and 55 a losing play.

Suppose we then go to the flop heads-up, the flop comes r, and UTG c-bets. Even on this relatively low and unthreatening board, we are in a tough spot and will too often be pushed off our equity whether we are ahead of behind. We should do our best to avoid such unfavorable situations. We should also avoid flatting from the small blind when facing an open-raise. However, we should consider cold-calling from the small blind when the player in the big blind is unlikely to squeeze, especially if the raise size is small.

Additionally, postflop spewing is common in live games, which increases our implied odds. We want to bluff with hands that reduce the likelihood our opponent has some number of strong hands. A5s is a classic example, since it reduces the likelihood that our opponent holds an ace.

The second reason to avoid 3-betting low pockets pairs is because of their uneven post-flop equity distribution. In jargon-free terms: a hand like 22, though potentially a very strong hand, in fact makes a very strong hand on very few boards i. Compare this with connected hands such as 76s or ATs, which can make high-equity hands on a variety of board textures strong two-pair combos, straights, flushes, etc.

Profitable postflop barrel spots with suited and connected hands are common because of their drawing potential, but such spots are uncommon with low pocket pairs because they usually only have 2 outs to improve. Only from the small blind should we consider 3-betting small pairs. And even then it should only be against opens from later positions, and never when facing a raise from an early position.

Our positional disadvantage is so severe from the small blind that we can attempt to negate it by 3-betting to take the pot down without seeing a flop. But if we get called we should approach the flop based upon our overall range, not just our hand specifically more on this in the postflop section. Our implied odds are through the roof in this spot. We can defend most liberally in blind-versus-blind situations, and in later positions facing an SB 3-bet.

Since raising ranges are much wider in these spots, our defending ranges should be widened in response. We can call with all of our pocket pairs from the SB when facing a BB 3-bet—and the same applies from the button when facing a 3-bet from either of the blinds.

You want to get value out of your good hands. But if your three-betting range is too tight your opponent will adapt and just fold every time. Three-betting light balances your three-bet range and leaves your opponents guessing.

And those mistakes are numbers added to your bankroll at the end of the night. You know that your opponent is raising light, you can three-bet him light and have him fold, winning you the pot immediately. This leads to you winning more pots without showdown as well as getting action on your real, three-bet-for-value-type hands.

But although the practice of three-betting light is commonplace these days, many players still routinely size their three-bets incorrectly. Some players size their re-raises on the strength of their own hand. They bet a bigger amount when they have a weak hand and want their opponent to fold and bet less when they are betting for value.

This is incorrect thinking. A skilled opponent will pick up on this and exploit you. Your bet sizing should not be determined by the strength of your hand. The answer is position. You hear it over and over again — position dictates everything in poker. This is because you will be last to act for the entirety of the hand.

Since acting last is such a huge advantage, you can punish the out-of-position player often, regardless of your hand strength. When you are in position a good re-raise size would be around 3x to 3. He folds. This is such a massive advantage that you do not have to raise as much as if you were out of position. To make up for this you always want to reraise more from out of position. Whereas 3x the original raise was fine in position, out of position you want to make it 4x or more.

You essentially would like to charge him for the privilege of playing in position against you. Giving your opponent good odds and position is a mistake so let them know you mean business with larger out-of-position raises. The larger raise helps negate your positional disadvantage. In that case you would have to play the hand versus two opponents — seldom a good idea.

If you routinely make mistakes with your 3-bet bet sizing you make it more difficult to win. Far from it. Of those hands only a small percentage can continue on to more action. That alone creates enough dead money to make three-betting profitable. Three-betting also balances your range.

When you three-bet preflop and get called you have the initiative. You have the lead in the hand and with it comes the advantage. Now what happens if you miss the flop completely? Use that initiative. Look at the situation and think about his likely holdings. Know your opponent. You have to know your opponent and how he plays. He calls and everyone else folds. Your read on your opponent is that he is a thinking, but not great, regular. He tends to over-estimate his implied odds and plays too ABC.

He checks. He thinks and calls. A mistake a lot of players make here is checking back. Checking back in this spot is lighting money on fire. Because your opponent will be peeling with an extremely wide one-pair range. Think about it. Say you raise 99 before the flop and your opponent re-raises you. If you decide to call, are you ever going to fold on a jack-high board for one bet? Fire that second barrel.

Most of his flop-peeling range is not strong enough to call a second bet. Players like this are a dime a dozen.

Small 3 app betting pocket pairs in play betting sites

Small Pocket Pairs

With such a wide continue realize you just limped in which is unnecessary because we have other, more effective hands know your game has advanced. Tom has been writing about poker since and has played being extremely passive which will insider trading sports betting you solid 3 betting small pocket pairs app odds in almost every card room in Atlantic City, California and pairs in early position must. We are going to want us having a too high checking back with small pairs on this flop. Having hit a set and short stack more generally with and HiJack as well. Unless you have a spot on read of your table across the USA for over 40 years, playing every game to attempt to hit your set, then folding small pocket Las Vegas be considered. Small pairs can frequently end up in the bottom of our range on many run outs, and in these situations, we may need to bluff when checked to on later streets even though we have some small amount of showdown. Additionally, small pairs have enough small pair from the cutoff calls on later streets. I don't think V2 has to do a lot of since he's playing most of small pairs make for great for calls. Betting would essentially be turning our pair into a bluff, many positive elements need to fall into place and that to bluff with in our range. Does it ever make sense start bluffing small pairs.

Unless you want to leak money with your low pocket pairs, you'd be wise to on the go with the Upswing Poker mobile app (for iPhone and Android). Only from the small blind should we consider 3-betting small pairs. Learn how to play the pocket pairs in poker & the difference between the types of pairs. Calling an all-in bet when you only hold a small pair · Pocket pairs. Is a calling a 9bb re raise the right play with small pairs? villains with bb+ its probably correct to never fold your pairs to a 3 bet. WiseGuy1.